Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Study finds nearly half of cancer survivors died from conditions other than cancer

Although cancer recurrence may be the overriding fear for many survivors, a study from VCU Massey Cancer Center found only 51 percent of cancer survivors died from cancer, meaning nearly half of survivors died from other conditions. These results indicate survivors could potentially benefit from a more comprehensive, less cancer-focused approach to their health, according to lead researcher Yi Ning, M.D., Sc.D., assistant professor in the department of epidemiology and community health at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and associate research member at VCU Massey Cancer Center.

Continue reading →

Making the decision to quit smoking

Cigarette for blog post

According to the surgeon general, 10 years after a smoker quits, his/her risk of dying from lung cancer is half that of a person who is still smoking. For anyone who has tried quitting, 10 years can seem like a lifetime away, but it is important to remember that after even just minutes of quitting your body begins to restore itself and puts you on the path to a healthier life.

Continue reading →

Enter the “Mos for Massey” Social Media Contest!

“Movemeber” is a campaign that encourages men to grow moustaches during the month of November to help raise awareness for testicular cancer, prostate cancer and mental health issues. VCU Massey Cancer Center invites everyone to join the “Movember” movement and help us raise awareness for men’s cancers by taking part in our “Mos for Massey” contest.

Continue reading →

An eye on prevention

Alex Krist for blog

Cancer screening can improve the length and quality of life, but the average American receives only half of recommended cancer preventive services. Massey researchers will conduct a new study supported by a multi-year, multi-phase grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to measure whether making personal health records with higher functionality available to primary care physicians and patients promotes shared health decision-making and increases the delivery of cancer screening.

Continue reading →

The importance of breast self-awareness in early detection

As part of their routine health care, women of all ages should be familiar with their bodies. Being aware of breast changes is especially important because many breast cancers are found by women themselves. To promote breast self-awareness, many advocacy groups encourage breast self-exams (BSE) on a routine basis. So, how do you properly perform a BSE and what should you look for?

Continue reading →