Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Prevention & control

Massey joins nation’s cancer centers in urging the public for increased HPV vaccination for cancer prevention

In response to low national vaccination rates for the human papillomavirus (HPV), VCU Massey Cancer Center has joined 68 of the nation’s top cancer centers in issuing a statement urging for increased HPV vaccination for the prevention of cancer. These institutions collectively recognize insufficient vaccination as a public health threat and call upon the nations’ physicians, parents and young adults to take advantage of this rare opportunity to prevent many types of cancer.

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Q&A on HPV with Dr. Iain Morgan

In honor of January as Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, VCU Massey Cancer Center expert Iain Morgan, Ph.D., answered some frequently asked questions about the human papillomavirus (HPV), which, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV affects both men and women and is the most common sexually transmitted infection.

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Massey, Tricycle Gardens bring fresh produce to cancer patients

Research continues to show that proper nutrition plays an important role in cancer prevention and control. To help provide cancer patients access to fresh vegetables, VCU Massey Cancer Center has partnered with Richmond-based urban farm Tricycle Gardens to establish a monthly farm stand outside of Massey’s Dalton Oncology Clinic. Additionally, a grant from the McKesson Foundation allows eligible SNAP/EBT participants to receive $2 worth of produce for every $1 of benefits spent on the farm stand produce.

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Massey researchers find that failure to expand ACA Medicaid coverage would widen disparities in screening uninsured and low-income women for breast and cervical cancer

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers recently conducted a study that found low-income and uninsured women in states that are not expanding their Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid coverage are less likely to receive breast and cervical cancer screenings compared to states that are implementing expansions.

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The Five Ws of Gynecologic Cancer

Prevention is key with any cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, more than half of all cancer deaths could be prevented by making healthy lifestyle choices, such as eating healthy and staying active. Every year, more than 80,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer. There are five main types of gynecologic cancers: ovarian, cervical, uterine, vaginal and vulvar. Following is information on risk factors, screening, and care.

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