Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Prevention & control

Integrative health recipe corner: fall harvest salad & spaghetti with broccolini pesto

This month’s first recipe focuses on fall and incorporates some easy-to-find fall ingredients—sweet potatoes or butternut squash, and pears—into the recipe. Both recipes focus on vegetables with bright colors, as colorful food is a sign of plenty of phytochemicals. Incorporating phytochemical- and anti-oxidant-rich foods into the diet offers protection against many health conditions, including cancer. Sweet potatoes or butternut squash contain beta-carotene and other carotenoids; broccolini (a hybrid of broccoli and kale) is a cruciferous vegetable bright green in color and high in fiber. Less colorful vegetables, including onions, garlic, shallots and cauliflower (you’ll find the first three in one or both of these two recipes—they are members of the Allium family) have plenty of anti-cancer effects in them, too, so don’t forget to include them in your diet along with brightly-colored vegetables.

Continue reading →

Myths and facts: ginger and cancer

In this month's Integrative Health Myths & Facts, we explore ginger's ability to treat nausea, a common chemotherapy related side effect.

Continue reading →

Integrative health myths & facts: sugar & cancer

There has been a lot of buzz about sugar making cancer cells grow faster and causing the cancer to spread faster, but what does the research suggest? 

Continue reading →

The aroma of good health

Aroma, the word alone brings powerful memories—some good, some not so good. Most people, however, have no idea how much aroma and our sense of smell can influence well-being. Enter aromatherapy.  

Continue reading →

Integrative health myths & facts: lavender & cancer

Lavender is a flower native to the Mediterranean area.  The name comes from the Latin “lavare” which means “to wash.” Lavender has been used in many folk medicine traditions for anxiety, insomnia, depression, as an antiseptic, for headaches and much more. But is there any evidence to show lavender’s effectiveness for cancer patients?  

Continue reading →