Virginia Commonwealth University

VCU Massey Cancer Center

2012 Archive

Antibodies from rabbits reduce risks associated with unrelated donor stem cell transplantation

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center‘s Bone Marrow Transplant Program have demonstrated that the use of antibodies derived from rabbits can improve the survival and relapse outcomes of leukemia and myelodysplasia patients receiving a stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor.

Continue reading →

Scientists develop mouse model that could lead to new therapies for liver cancer

Researchers have created the first mouse model demonstrating the role of a cancer promoting gene, Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), in hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver cancer. The mouse model represents a critical step in understanding the molecular mechanisms of liver cancer progression and could lead to novel therapies for the disease.

Continue reading →

New technology improves detection of prostate cancer cells in a patient’s bloodstream

VCU Massey Cancer Center continues to test new technology by ApoCell, Inc. that can detect circulating tumor cells (CTC) in a patient’s bloodstream. In April, Massey reported on a pilot study of the device in liver cancer patients, and now a new study demonstrates that the device can effectively collect CTCs in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

Continue reading →

Novel radiation therapy safely treats prostate cancer and lowers the risk of recurrence

A recent phase 2/3 clinical trial has shown that a new combination of radiation therapies developed at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center  escalates radiation doses to safely and effectively treat prostate cancer and lower the risk of recurrence with minimal radiation exposure to nearby healthy tissue and organs.

Continue reading →

Scientists discover mechanism that promotes lung cancer growth and survival

Paul Fisher

A multi-institutional research study has uncovered a new mechanism that may lead to unique treatments for lung cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide. “Cancer cells are remarkably adaptive and depend on a variety of mechanisms to ensure their survival and continued growth when challenged by their environment,” says John C. Reed, M.D., Ph.D., professor and CEO of Sanford-Burnham. “By reducing levels of BI-1, it appears we were able to modulate intracellular signals and starve lung cancer cells of the energy needed to carry out one of their most important survival mechanisms, autophagy.”

Continue reading →